Loading...

Friday, 20 December 2013

Terms and conditions for UBT phone users


These are the radical, ridiculous and plain crazy rules that the Hales cultists are obligated to sign in order to obtain a ludicrously overpriced phone:



23 comments:

  1. The terms and conditions under which the mobile phones are supplied include some that astonish me. They suggest an extraordinary level of distrust and a penchant for extreme dictatorial control. Look at this, for example.

    2. The Customer agrees and undertakes as follows:
    2.1 I, specifically accept that the smartphone device will not be used for any inappropriate social communication or activity.
    2.4 Smartphone device users under 24 years of age must leave their smartphone device in a secure position either in the office or in the vehicle at night and during weekends. The smartphone device is not to be used at home.
    2.6 The smartphone device is not to be connected to any other device or be used for entertainment.
    2.7 No Music or any other application or software is to be installed on the smartphone device without the written permission of UBT.
    2.8 The camera on the smartphone device is not to be used for any unsuitable purpose.

    If this is supposed to be a legal contract, how do you define terms such as “inappropriate social communication” or “unsuitable purpose.” What do they suspect their members might use the phones for?

    A prize for the best guess.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Its so easy to tell this UBT racket is design for a closed shop captured market customer !

    The telco ubt phone website is mostly password protected, not viewable to joe public shoppers researching phone providers, or even to business users without having to register first, it all looks very suspicious.

    This T&C document makes one thing clear, the astronomically expensive costs and upfront payments, as shown in the costs plan in the other thread, for example, Blackberry Q10 inc 150 minutes, upfront payment £445 then £37.99 per month, does not actually 'Buy' the user the phone !. The phone is never the users to keep, it is UBT’s, the whole agreement on each phone is a ‘rental’ agreement !

    Initially, when I saw the payment and talk plans in the other thread I thought the upfront payments actually bought the user (Brethren members), the phone, but reading the T&Cs this is not the case, as clearly shown by these clauses

    1.2. Mobile phones are intended for long-term rental on a 24-month contract; not for short-term hire. A Termination fee will be incurred should the contract be ended before the 24 month period is completed and this shall be calculated as follows: (60% of monthly tariff charge X number of months remaining) + £25 administration fee.

    1.8 The smartphone device remains the property of UBT and UBT retains the right to withdraw the smartphone device from a Customer at any time after giving 14 days’ notice in writing. Where this is necessary, no further rental payments accrue as from the expiration of such notice, but no rental payments will be refunded.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Quote: "UBT retains the right to withdraw the smartphone device from a Customer at any time after giving 14 days’ notice in writing."

    So someone who is withdrawn from can keep his phone for two weeks after being kicked out. He can insist on the 14 days in writing. These are the legal terms! I don't think they have considered that point.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Another curious condition is 1.4. “The smartphone device must only be used by the approved registered user whose user name appears in the billing information.”

    Presumably that means if they monitor the usage to see who is talking to whom, they can be sure about who is being spied on. What other reason could there be to restrict use to the registered user?

    HEB and North Korea have quite a lot in common. It's sinister.

    ReplyDelete
  6. "If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck."

    (for duck read cult)

    Jill

    ReplyDelete
  7. Mine is an outsider's voice:

    This kind of thing doesn't happen in mainstream Christian churches, where no-one would ever dream of imposing that kind of control over how a fellow Christian used her/his smartphone. To my knowledge, churches don't sell smartphones in any case.

    Why, when the PBCC is so keen to be accepted as a mainstream church, does it allow its senior men to behave as if they were in charge of a cult?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Exactly my thoughts Joan. I'm an outsider too - just appalled at the way people are abused and the name of Jesus is demeaned by this cult. Every time they try to claim the 'church' does not influence/control the brethren businesses they then show another way in which it does. As a B2B transaction, what is inappropriate social communication? As a B2B transaction, what does "The camera on the smartphone device is not to be used for any unsuitable purpose." and so on. These are moral issues I assume, not the usual ones a telephone provider stipulates.

    BTW I had heard that the GPS on the phones had to be activated and on. Together with only for the principal's use - ie a defined individual it does sound like they're being tracked doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you suggesting that they track adults?

      Delete
    2. Golly, that sounds even more sinister! But I shall await confirmation.

      Delete
    3. The bit about GPS is complete cobblers. makes a nice juicy story but no that is not true. No one tracks you!!!

      Delete
    4. Your evidence jim?

      Delete
    5. Jim's earlier unnecessary foul language does not strengthen his assertion!

      Delete
    6. It looks like the philistines of the Exclusive Brethren (PBCC Ltd) are now upon us. I was wondering under which stone they were hiding. One can always tell these very "spiritual" folk....foul language, inability to present an argument, lack of courtesy and being generally unpleasant. No public benefit there.

      #Notapublicbenefit

      Delete
  9. In countries where the EB operate, tracking a vehicle without the driver's consent is almost certainly illegal.

    If an employer fits a vehicle used for business with a gps device it must be declared to the employee.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Big brother is watching you!

    ReplyDelete
  11. It is possible to use phones roughly to locate users even if the GPS function is not switched on, and even if they do not make any phone calls. A telephone company can tell where their nearest communications antenna is, and can infer that they must be somewhere near it.

    However, there are probably several laws that make it illegal to use telephone records to spy on Brethren’s activities or to enforce Brethren rules. There is the Data Protection Act, for instance. If, for the purposes of billing your client, you collect data on phone calls he has made, it is illegal to use these records for any other purpose, such as detecting “Moabitish” or “Midianitish” contacts and enforcing Brethren rules. The need to respect individual privacy is now built into many of our laws.

    I think the lack of trust is operating in both directions. The leadership obviously distrust the followers, not even trusting them to make their own decisions about when, where and how to use their phones, and the followers appear to distrust the leaders too, because many of them buy an extra, independent phone whose usage cannot be spied on by the leadership or by UBT. Why do they do that? I expect it is because they want to guard against the risk of being spied on when they use a UBT phone.

    The report a few months ago of individual brethren at a meeting being ushered into a side-room and searched for electronic devices (perhaps non-approved phones) was another indication of extreme distrust.

    The atmosphere of distrust is reminiscent of the opening scenes of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, in which the Emperor is in constant fear of a conspiracy to usurp him.

    “Let me have men about me that are fat, sleek-headed men and such as sleep a-nights. Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look. He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.”

    Well, BDH may have around him plenty of men that are fat, but he still has good reason to fear the ones that think too much. You don’t need to think very much to see that something is very rotten in the state of Brethrenism.

    I ask myself whether the rottenness can be cured before the Ides of March.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The Ides of March, isn't that when the Charity Commission Tribunal might be?

    Matthew

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's the 6th Jan, isn't it? Or is it the Ides of March?

    ReplyDelete
  14. The decision I understand will be made on the 6th January as to whether the tribunal will go ahead. If they decide it is to go ahead it would be about 2 months for both sides to exchange evidence I believe. Matthew you might know otherwise?

    If the tribunal is suspended again …. well it verges on the laughable doesn't it.
    Jill

    ReplyDelete
  15. It is highly unlikely that the more weird conditions of this are enforceable. But since most EB do not know that they will think that they are. Same when they sign confidentiality agreements when leaving the EB (non-business restrictions such as not to talk about church) or marriage vows which include the teaching of the Hales' dynasty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is an important point, John. There are several basic human rights that you cannot sign away, and any contract signed under duress cannot bind you morally or legally. I think some of the agreements that EB members feel obliged to sign are legally and morally worthless, and should be treated as such. Some EB members may find it a relief to discover this.

      Delete