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Wednesday, 16 October 2013

Remarkable parity with PBCC

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4108668?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

3 comments:

  1. "The Scientologists were accused of pressuring members into paying large sums for questionable services and materials and using "commercial harassment" against recruits."

    So it's commercial harassment to have to buy the 'Ministry' from Brucie?

    Looks that way. But what isn't harassment in an EB's life in some way. Usually Fear, Finance and Family compelling their actions?

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  2. I think this precedent will serve as a warning against similar groups, and could be followed up by further prosecutions.

    The trouble is that religious fraud often takes a form that is difficult to prove. For example, when Jim Taylor repeatedly demanded money and promised, “Follow me and I’ll get you to heaven,” it would be rather difficult to prove to the satisfaction of a court that he couldn’t deliver on his promise, because it was in the future. It is pretty safe to promise just about anything for future delivery at an unspecified date. Some televangelists in the USA are currently promising that if people give them money right now, God will repay them tenfold, at a future unspecified date. That’s similar to the Nigerian internet scams, which draw victims in by appealing to their greed.

    The Scientologists got caught out by promising benefits in the here-and-now, which could be shown to be illusory.

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  3. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OBA6qlHW8po&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DOBA6qlHW8po

    ReplyDelete